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Recently a reader in Cape Breton asked me where to find Psalm 23 in Gaelic. If you’re not already part of a Gaelic community or taking classes, it can be hard to find! This post offers a video of us singing the metrical 23rd Psalm, the text of the metrical and regular Bible versions, and more information about the Gaelic psalm singing and the Gaelic Bible, including the new free app and translation.

Here’s a list of free online resources for exploring Gaelic in Nova Scotia. They are good for learning Gaelic language, songs or folklore, and history and research projects.

I put on my anthropology hat, dust off a previously unpublished conference paper, and look at how different Nova Scotia Gaelic users orient to place in culturally Gaelic ways, in the construction of their Gaelic identities.

Having a wedding ceremony in a Celtic language is fairly rare nowadays, but we were excited to try. Let me tell you the story of My Big Fat Gaelic Wedding (A’ Bhanais Mhór Ghàidhealach Dhà Rì-ribh agam)!

I interview linguist Dr. Conor Quinn about the Ogham alphabet, how it relates to Irish & Gaelic, and what to be aware of if you’re using it in a tattoo.

The English language bears traces of historical contact with Gaelic: we explore Gaelic loanwords in English, and the influence of Gaelic grammar on English dialects.

A post focused on the intersections between LGBT+ history and issues and Scottish Gaelic people and language, including a free mini Gaelic lexicon with LGBT & related concepts.

You may be thinking about learning Scottish Gaelic. If so, this blog post will give you an idea of where to start. You can follow a number of different paths to learn Gaelic, including online courses, local classes, and destination learning. This post will describe the general options are, and show you how to seek out the classes that best suit your learning style and budget.

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