Nova Scotia

Here’s a list of free online resources for exploring Gaelic in Nova Scotia. They are good for learning Gaelic language, songs or folklore, and history and research projects.

I put on my anthropology hat, dust off a previously unpublished conference paper, and look at how different Nova Scotia Gaelic users orient to place in culturally Gaelic ways, in the construction of their Gaelic identities.

Having a wedding ceremony in a Celtic language is fairly rare nowadays, but we were excited to try. Let me tell you the story of My Big Fat Gaelic Wedding (A’ Bhanais Mhór Ghàidhealach Dhà Rì-ribh agam)!

The English language bears traces of historical contact with Gaelic: we explore Gaelic loanwords in English, and the influence of Gaelic grammar on English dialects.

This post offers a look at the current state of Gaelic education in the province of Nova Scotia. It also lets Nova Scotia parents know what they can do to try to get Gaelic taught in their child’s own school, if it isn’t currently offered there.

Not one, but two Gaelic flag-raising ceremonies in downtown Halifax to mark Mìos na Gàidhlig – Gaelic Awareness Month – in the province of Nova Scotia! Photos and videos from April 27, 2016.

What’s it like to attend a Scottish Gaelic milling frolic in Halifax, Nova Scotia? I’ll “waulk” you through it (pun intended) with videos and photos!

Brìghde, Bríde, Breeshey, Brigid or St. Bridget is a saint not only of Ireland, but also of Scottish and Manx Gaels. Her feast day is February 1st and signals the return of spring. Here I explore some of her Gaelic traditions and suggest some ways to celebrate the eve of her feast day at home on January 31st.

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